Scarred Tree - Glebe Anglican Church

The Scarred Tree is a project of St John’s Glebe and Anglican Aid. It brings healing and honour to Indigenous Australians scarred by trauma, exclusion and injustice. It is located at The St John’s Centre, 132 St John’s Rd Glebe, but it serves the wider Sydney region.

St John’s has a serious commitment to partner with Indigenous Australians.

St John’s traces its history back to the first fleet, the designation of the land for church use and thus to the dispossession of the Gadigal people, the first custodians of the land now known as Glebe. Within the church grounds there is an actual scarred tree, which is thought to be the oldest tree in Sydney outside the Botanical Gardens, predating British occupation.

Research, observation and practical community experiences has revealed that Indigenous Australians in the Glebe and surrounding communities continue to be impacted by discrimination, social exclusion, poverty and the forced removal of children.

Within Glebe there are 1800 public housing tenancies, with an estimated population of 4,000 people. These tenancies are focussed on Indigenous families as well as on people with high needs, such as people suffering from mental illness, single parents, the aged and people gripped by drug and substance abuse.

The Scarred Tree project enables Indigenous culture and its contribution to society to be recognised and respected. Friendships are nurtured with non Indigenous families and individuals. Within the project Indigenous families and individuals are supported and resourced for parenting and school participation. Personal counselling and financial assistance through the No Interest Loans Scheme (NILS) is offered. Families caught up in the justice system, particularly juvenile justice, are supported. Individuals are trained in leadership and advocacy. Members of the stolen generation are encouraged to meet and to share their stories. People are invited to eat together and to learn from one another as friends and family within a Christian context, which respects Indigenous culture, acknowledges elders and recognises past traditions).

Direct Deposit donations can be made to our bank account BSB 032078, Account Number 253493, Account Name: Anglican Aid. Please email the office with details of your donation at enquiries@anglicanaid.org.au. Cheques can be posted to – PO Box Q190, QVB Post Office, 1230, NSW.

All donations are tax deductible.

ABN 28 525 237 517

  • Lord God, you are our creator and sustainer. Enable The Scarred Tree to be an instrument of your grace. May all those, who come under its influence, be affirmed and equipped to live with purpose and dignity. May past and present injustices be corrected. May repentance and forgiveness be expressed and experienced. May Indigenous Australians be given sure hope and genuine opportunity. We ask in the name of Jesus, your Son and our Lord. Amen
  • Give thanks for Paul Perini (the minister of St John's) and local Indigenous leadership as they implement this exciting project which will offer counselling, No Interest Loans (NILS) and budget assistance, parenting skills, school participation and leadership and advocacy skills.

Scarred Tree

Annual Report 2014

WITHIN the grounds of St John’s Anglican Church, Glebe, stands a scarred tree, thought to be the oldest tree in Sydney outside the Botanical Gardens, but one of thousands of surviving trees in NSW which bear scars resulting from removal of bark or wood by Aboriginal people in the past to make canoes, shields and other artefacts.

The Glebe survivor now has given its name to The Scarred Tree, a project of St John’s supported by Anglican Aid, which aims to bring healing and honour to Indigenous Australians scarred by trauma, exclusion and injustice.

St John’s has a serious commitment to partner with Indigenous Australians. The church traces its history back to early colonial settlement, the designation of land for church use and so to the dispossession of the Gadigal people, the first custodians of the land now known as Glebe.

Research, observation and practical community experience have shown that Indigenous Australians in the Glebe and surrounding communities continue to suffer discrimination, social exclusion and poverty.

More than 300 Indigenous people live in Glebe, mainly in public housing – the third largest such population in the City of Sydney local government area.

The Scarred Tree project enables Indigenous culture and its contribution to society to be recognised and respected. Friendships with non-Indigenous people are nurtured, while families and individuals receive help with parenting and school participation.

The project offers personal counselling and also financial help through the No Interest Loans Scheme (NILS). Families caught up in the justice system, particularly juvenile justice, are supported. Individuals are trained in leadership and advocacy. Members of the “stolen generation” are encouraged to meet and share their stories.

People are invited to eat together and learn from one another as friends and family within a Christian context which respects Indigenous culture, acknowledges elders and recognises traditions.